1

According to the current tag wikis, the [infant] tag includes children up to 2 years of age (i.e. the first 24 months). The [toddler] tag starts at 2 years and ends at around 3 years.

I think the infant/toddler border is set too high; I'd like the border to be defined as "has begun to walk". An online lookup supports this.

May I change the definitions and re-tag existing questions, or do you disagree (why)?

  1. Infant: a child during the earliest period of its life, especially before he or she can walk.
  2. Toddler: a person who toddles [to move with short, unsteady steps], especially a young child learning to walk.

(Source: Dictionary.com)

2

I don't see that any re-tag is needed, in fact if you look at the full tag definitions you'll see they do cover exactly what you're talking about:

https://parenting.stackexchange.com/tags/toddler/info
This age specific tag covers questions about kids after they start toddling around on 2 feet, but before you start working on school skills with them, so say from about 2 years of age to about 3 years. As with any age specific tag, the edges are fuzzy between this and the previous and following tags: infant and pre-schooler. A rule of thumb: if they are seriously mobile, it's time to move into this tag from infant, and when they start to develop social skills appropriate for school then you're ready to move up to pre-schooler.

https://parenting.stackexchange.com/tags/infant/info
This age specific tag covers questions about infants after they realize there's more to the world than eating, sleeping and filling a diaper, but before they start toddling around on 2 feet, so say from about 3 months of age to about 2 years. As with any age specific tag, the edges are fuzzy between this and the following tag: toddler. A rule of thumb: this time frame ends roughly when they become seriously mobile.

So it sounds like you want to do two things:

  1. adjust the age guideline between the two downward from 24 months
  2. change the summary to talk about the developmental steps instead of the age range

I'm ok with half of #1. The current age ranges were not meant to imply hard cut offs, but rather the wide range of possible options, there probably should be MORE overlap than they currently have. While kids can start walking as early as a year, many don't... so we shouldn't cut off at a year, by 2 years, the vast majority of kids have started walking... so that still seems a good end of that tag. But since many start earlier, the should certainly start sooner.

If you're going to tackle the summary, I'd ask that you add developmental steps to all of them instead of just these two so that the summaries stay consistent.

1

I agree that the age ranges seem off. 12 months seems more like an appropriate cut-off than 24 months.

However, I'm not sure I agree with the proposed definition of toddler.

Generally, "toddler" is used to describe a broad category of developmental stages, only some of which are linked to mobility. "Toddler" can refer to the stage of foods the child is ready for, clothes sizes, or even cognitive milestones.

Children can start to walk as early as 9 months or as late as 17 months. Early or late walking, or quick transition from unsteady walking to running, does not imply corresponding transitions for the other milestones.

I think "Age specific questions from about 12 months to..." works better than the current tag, but has less variation from child to child than your proposed definition.

The hard part, IMO, is to determine the upward boundary for when a child ceases to be a toddler. Opinions on when children outgrow the title "toddler" seems to range from anywhere from 2 years of age to 5 years.

  • I agree with your concerns, it should not be measured purely by walking ability. I was including that as evidence that 2 years is too high as threshold. How about saying toddler is 1~3 years, and after that the existing tag [pre-school] kicks in? – Torben Gundtofte-Bruun May 26 '11 at 20:34
  • 1
    @tobengb I think 1~3 years sounds ideal. – user420 May 26 '11 at 23:42

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