Hot answers tagged

13

You're right, our off-topic list includes sex. However, this is generally interpreted as questions related to how to become pregnant, or those that don't have anything to do with a parent-child issue. (Ref. sex, sexual-education, sexual-development...) An adult child asking how to discuss sleeping arrangements when visiting their parents with their partner, ...


9

I think renaming the site to something like Family Dynamics would be a lot more misleading than Parenting. First, from the tour page: Parenting Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for parents, grandparents, nannies and others with a parenting role. IE: anyone with a parenting role, regardless of if they are an actual parent (or a parent of ...


7

Yes. It'd fall under safety considerations (and typically is tagged safety although I wouldn't object if you create child-proofing). Just make sure you're asking about general principles and not specific product recommendations.


7

I agree with @Erica that this question is on topic. Whether we realize it or not, psychology influences every aspect of our parenting. How to discipline, how to praise effectively, how to show love, at what age children develop, say, the concept of object permanence, death, self... this list is as extensive as the research that has been done. We don't know ...


7

I agree that it is on-topic for parenting. While the topic is not necessarily direct parenting (as opposed to, say, how to feed a newborn), understanding childhood development and it's associated psychological background is useful. In general, information such as that helps parents become aware of the long-term (and usually unanticipated) effects of their ...


6

I'll answer why I thought that question was probably okay to stay open, and thus answered it. I'll cover the Good Subjective question checklist. Finally, I'll also explain why I answered it specifically. Apologies for the length in advance! Why it is a good question for the site First off, I fall much further on the "subjective" side of questions being ...


5

In general, I think that a question from a child's perspective (or a question from a child but asked from the parent's perspective) is valid. Both as parents in our own families, and as a parenting community, I would find it highly problematic to outright ignore questions that children have about how this relationship should work. However, in this specific ...


5

What you have is sufficient. One close vote is nothing to worry about. It's possible someone just didn't read carefully or misinterpreted what you wrote. If it was 3 or 4 votes or your post got closed, then I would worry about it.


5

Subjective questions are generally discouraged... To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where … every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?” your answer is provided along with the question, and you expect more answers: “I use ______ for ______, what do you use?” ...


4

I don't equate medical with physician visit/prescription. I posit that asking about home remedies is asking for medical advice, specifically seeking: a way to avoid a visit to a professional ("do we need to see a doctor for [list of symptoms]?") an alternative to the advice of a professional The reasons for seeking a home remedy might be financial (I can'...


4

(I started this as a comment to deword's excellent answer, but when it started to spill over into the third comment, I thought I'd better post as an answer. If this isn't correct, please let me know.) This is a great answer. I also believe, however, that A E makes a good case for his position. Addressing this statement: Because frankly, if tea-tree oil was ...


4

As one of the closers, this isn't really a "legal" thing, it's a "responsibility" thing. Medical advice on the internet falls into two camps: stuff you can find on the NHS website (well researched, official), and stuff you can only find on forums (anecdotal, occasionally actively harmful). To use your example, if you ask a parent who's used tea-tree oil and ...


4

Absolutely. If you look in the Related sidebar to the right, you will see we have a few meta posts on this already. From our Help page: What topics can I ask about here? We welcome questions on topics like these: matters of upbringing, safety considerations, food and feeding, health and hygiene, development and growth, language development, behavior and ...


4

Yes, you can ask about issues with your parents. Although it is not specified in our list of site scope, it has been done often, and falls under matters of upbringing. For example, see this question and this one and their answers. These types of questions tend to be less well received (the main focus here is how to proceed with parenting), but being ...


4

You'll see on our help page: Parenting Stack Exchange is for parents, grandparents, nannies and others who care for children. We welcome questions on topics like these: matters of upbringing, safety considerations, food and feeding, health and hygiene, development and growth, language development, behavior and social skills, discipline and punishment, ...


4

Either raise it in meta, as you have, or flag for a moderator so we can lock or delete, as appropriate. In this instance, I have put a historical lock on the post.


4

I agree with much of what you've said. We routinely get questions about adult children and they are on-topic. If they were willing to listen to strangers on the Internet, they could have posted a question themselves, though. Yes, the parents haven't cared enough to post on the internet themselves. But the internet is a funny thing. Not infrequently, ...


4

Personal opinion as a physician-user: I believe Joe's comment is completely correct in the case of your face blindness answer. The child does not have symptoms - not even close! - for the diagnosis of prosopagnosia, and if your answer wasn't immediately dismissed by the OP, you might well have caused a lot of unfounded anxiety. The OCD answer is at least ...


3

There is a Stack Exchange rule which excludes the under 13's from having an account, so younger children are excluded from your suggestion, but for the older children I can see no problem in having them ask questions, as long as they remain on topic. They may need to be rephrased (we have had some like that before) From our site scope: We welcome ...


3

Quoted from the StackExchange Meta migration FAQ. Emphasis below is mine: If you don't have 3,000 reputation, the site isn't in the list of available migration targets, or the question got closed without being migrated, do not fret. You can also flag the question for moderator attention and request that they migrate it for you. Simply explain in ...


3

I thought a similar thing when I read the question. A few notes: The fact that an answer was to some extent medical advice doesn't necessarily imply the question is bad. As long as the answer isn't venturing into the realm of liability, which I don't think it was, it's fine by itself, and as long as that's not the only possible answer, it's not relevant ...


3

My opinion is largely similar to CreationEdge, but I did want to add an explanation of what I think is appropriate. I think that the key to determining if something is on topic here (as a topic) is: Is this something Parents would be interested in based primarily on their being a parent? Is this something Parents might have expertise in based primarily on ...


3

I've been around SO and parenting.se for quite a while now and I sometimes just know which questions will be closed. I know the rules and know the community well enough. That question was one of those which don't actually strictly fit the criteria of parenting.SE, like ... usefulness. But it doesn't violate any rules and closing it as "primarily opinion ...


3

Thanks for opening this in meta, Jeremy. I've amended the question to make it clearer that I'm not seeking medical advice, but rather experience from other parents who have dealt with the same issue. I think we should be open to questions about first aid and minor childhood ailments, e.g. the scraped knee that Erica gives as an example. I don't see any ...


3

As Erica pointed out, the last time a similar question was asked, the agreed policy was left as: Medical questions should solicit advice from a parent's point of view, requiring no professional expertise, and should not seek to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease. I closed the given question primarily because it was seeking to treat a disease. ...


3

I prefer to use the rule, "would I ask this question of an acquaintance at the playground". In general, what this means is that several factors weigh: Severity. If the answer is "No", and you don't see a doctor, and it turns out you probably should have, what are the downsides? If it's significant, then it's medical advice. Urgency. If this is an ...


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